Please check your internet connection...

Los Del Rio

Los Del Rio

7,840 Followers

|

704.9K Plays

Latest Album

Popular Songs

Macarena
Los Del Rio
4:09
4:09
Macarena (Bayside Boys Remix)
Los Del Rio
3:51
3:51
Mas Macarena (feat. Los Del Rio)
Gente De Zona
3:09
3:09
Soy Un Truhán Soy Un Señor (feat. Julio Iglesias)
Los Del Rio
3:12
3:12
Summermix 2005 (ft. T-Rio & O-Zone & Lou Bega & Los Del Rio)
Crazy DJ's
3:15
3:15

Singles

Nadie Se Lleva Nada (feat. Los del Río)
Manuel Orta
3:42
3:42
Borriquito (feat. Los del Río)
Sabor De Gracia
4:05
4:05
Pero Llegó la Navidad
Machukamba & Los Del Río
3:18
3:18

Biography

Los Del Rio

Dolores del Río (Spanish pronunciation: ; born María de los Dolores Asúnsolo López-Negrete (August 3, 1905 – April 11, 1983), was a Mexican actress of cinema, theater and television. She was a Hollywood star in the 1920s and 1930s, and was one of the most important female figures of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema in the 1940s and 1950s. She was the first Latin American female star to be recognized internationally. During the 1920s in Hollywood, Dolores was considered one of the most beautiful women of her time, a female version of Rudolph Valentino, the Latin Lover of the Silent Cinema. Her career flourished until the end of the silent era, with successful films like Resurrection (1927) and Ramona (1928). She was one of the few Hollywood superstars of the silent era to adapt to the talkies. In the 1930s, she was noted for her participation in numerous films of the Pre-Code era like Bird of Paradise (1932), Flying Down to Rio (1933) and Madame Du Barry (1934). When her Hollywood career began to decline, del Río returned to her native country and joined the Mexican film industry, which at that time was at its peak. When del Río returned to Mexico in the early 1940s, she became one of the most important female stars of the Golden Age of Mexican cinema. A series of films including Flor silvestre (1943), María Candelaria (1943), Las Abandonadas (1944), Bugambilia (1944) and La Malquerida (1949), are considered classic masterpieces of the Mexican cinema. Del Río remained a force in the cinema of her native country for the next three decades and only returned to Hollywood sporadically. Her long career also spanned theater and television.