Dame Edith Evans

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3,850 Plays
The Importance of Being Earnest - A trivial play for serious people, Act II (Garden at the Manor House, Woolton): Shall I lay tea here as usual, Miss? (Merriman, Cecily, Gwendolen)
The Importance of Being Earnest - A trivial play for serious people, Act I (Algernon Moncrieff's flat in Half-Moon Street, London W): [Mendelssohn: Wedding March]...Oh, do stop playing that ghastly tune, Algy! (Jack, Algernon, Lane)
The Importance of Being Earnest - A trivial play for serious people, Act I (Algernon Moncrieff's flat in Half-Moon Street, London W): [Schubert: Moment musical No. 3 in F minor]...Did you hear what I was playing, Lane? (Algernon, Lane)
Full Many A Glorious Morning Have I Seen / Being Your Slave What Should I Do But Tend / How Like A Winter Hath My Absence Been / Sweet Love Renew Thy Force, Be It Not Said / To Me Fair Friend You Never Can Be Old
The Importance of Being Earnest - A trivial play for serious people, Act I (Algernon Moncrieff's flat in Half-Moon Street, London W): Charming day it has been, Miss Fairfax (Jack, Gwendolen)
Act II (Conclusion); Act III - Scene 1 [ft. Dame Edith Evans ,Claire Bloom ]
Act III - Scene 2 Through Scene 5 Beginning (ft. Dame Edith Evans ,Claire Bloom )
Act III (Conclusion); Act IV [ft. Dame Edith Evans ,Claire Bloom ]

Dame Edith Mary Evans, DBE (8 February 1888 – 14 October 1976) was an English actress. She was best known for her work on the stage, but also appeared in films towards the beginning and end of her career. Evans's stage career spanned sixty years during which she played more than 100 roles, in classics by Shakespeare, Congreve, Goldsmith, Sheridan and Wilde, and plays by contemporary writers including Bernard Shaw, Enid Bagnold, Christopher Fry and Noël Coward. She created roles in two of Shaw's plays: Orinthia in The Apple Cart (1929), and Epifania in The Millionairess (1940) and was in the British premieres of two others: Heartbreak House (1921) and Back to Methuselah (1923). Evans became widely known for portraying haughty aristocratic women, as in two of her most famous roles: Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest, and Miss Western in the 1963 film of Tom Jones. By contrast, she played a downtrodden maid in The Late Christopher Bean (1933), a deranged, impoverished old woman in The Whisperers (1967) and – one of her most celebrated roles – the Nurse in Romeo and Juliet, which she played in four productions between 1926 and 1961.